Category Archives: Teen Pregnancy

Waiting for the Title X Shoe to Drop

NFPRHA graphic on Guttmacher

Graphic via National Family Planning & Reproductive Health Association on Twitter.

Any day now, we expect the Trump administration to issue its Title X Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA)—and to be honest, we’re a little nervous.

After all, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) political appointee overseeing the Title X program, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Population Affairs Teresa Manning, has publicly opposed the use of federal funds for family planning and stated that contraception is ineffective. The former anti-abortion lobbyist also opposes emergency contraception. What’s more, a memo leaked last month suggested that advisers to the Trump administration are seeking to slash Title X funding by half—and/or to promote the “fertility awareness” method of birth control in place of other, more effective forms of contraception.

The National Family Planning & Reproductive Health Association, of which we are a member, sees the likelihood of an attack on Title X as “High;” the Guttmacher Institute said in October: “Never in its history has the nation’s family planning safety net been in such jeopardy as it is today.”

You can see why we’re not exactly optimistic.

There are a few ways HHS could go after family planning providers through Title X:

  • By cutting or eliminating Title X funding altogether;
  • By altering the parameters of the grant to include so-called “crisis pregnancy centers” (which use tactics of misinformation and deception to prevent women from accessing abortion care) as eligible entities or “tiering” providers (giving preference to public health departments or primary care providers in order to shut out non-profit organizations like MFP);
  • By putting onerous conditions on Title X recipients—and their patients—such as requiring parental notification and consent for teens seeking contraceptive care, a policy repeatedly rejected by the Maine Legislature;
  • By instituting what’s known as the Domestic Gag Rule, which would bar Title X-funded health care providers from talking about abortion as one of three choices available to pregnant patients who come to us for comprehensive options counseling.

Under any of the above scenarios, the Maine Family Planning network of providers (18 MFP clinics, plus four Planned Parenthood sites, 20 Federally-Qualified Health Centers, and five school-based health centers) would be hamstrung in its ability to provide a full range of contraceptive and reproductive health care services to low-income, uninsured, and underinsured women, men, and teens around the state.

We are staying vigilant as the right wing’s latest attack on women’s health care looms. Stay tuned.

New Abortion Data: A Clarion Call to Family Planning Advocates

On Thursday, the Guttmacher Institute released a new analysis published in the American Journal of Public Health, giving insight into US abortion trends.

The data is fascinating and Maine Family Planning views it as a clarion call to continue and expand the work we’re doing in our clinics, in court, and in our communities.

The report from Guttmacher shows an overall decline in the US abortion rate between 2008-2014. Despite the 25 percent decline, abortion is still a common procedure in this country; one in four American women will have an abortion by age 45. Deep disparities remain among different demographic groups, with abortion increasingly concentrated among poor women and a long history of racism and discrimination contributing to differences in the abortion rate according to race and ethnicity.

These findings underscore the important work Maine Family Planning is doing to increase contraceptive use and abortion access around the state, as well as how much is at stake amid political attacks on reproductive health care nationwide. We see a declining abortion rate as a victory only if it is rooted in advances in comprehensive, affordable reproductive health care and the political and social conditions to support reproductive self-determination for everyone. Unfortunately, at least some of the recent decline can be attributed to politically-motivated & medically unnecessary state-level abortion restrictions that prevent women in many states from accessing care when they need it. Additionally, it’s clear that quality health care services remain financially out of reach for some Americans, rendering them unable to effectively plan pregnancies. As the hostile Trump administration continues its assault on health care, we fear these factors will only become more pronounced.

Our focus remains on empowering women to avoid unintended pregnancies via highly effective contraceptive methods, to be able to access abortion when they need to, and to make decisions based on their own visions of the families they want. Maine Family Planning is battling on many fronts to achieve full access to reproductive freedom: From offering comprehensive prevention programming in schools and long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) in our clinics; to providing innovative abortion care via telemedicine; to fighting in court to expand Medicaid coverage for abortions and overturn Maine’s burdensome law prohibiting nurse practitioners from providing abortion; to working with like-minded groups on the upcoming Yes on 2 vote to make Maine the first state to expand Medicaid by referendum. Guttmacher’s latest statistics prove that our work remains vital and necessary.

What type of contraception is best for me? Part 2 – The Pill

Let’s face it, even though condoms are the most accessible form of contraceptive for teens, they aren’t necessarily the “best” option out there. Condoms have to be used correctly every time you engage in sexual intercourse in order to prevent STIs and unplanned pregnancies. This is why it is highly recommended for people who are sexually active to “double up” on their birth control. This means that you use two forms of contraceptives instead of just one. The most common combination is using both condoms and oral contraceptives, i.e., the pill.

Condoms represent a barrier method of birth control, while the pill is a hormonal method. The pill works by regulating a woman’s menstrual cycle and preventing ovulation. In simpler terms, the pill prevents a woman’s ovary from releasing an egg. Without an egg, conception cannot occur because the sperm has nothing to fertilize. The pill also works by thickening cervical mucus to prevent sperm from entering the uterus in the first place!

If used perfectly, the pill can be up to 99% effective! However, in order to be as effective as possible, the pill needs to be taken every day at approximately the same time of day. This can be difficult, especially in the hectic life of a teen! That is why using a condom as well helps to be sure than no unwanted pregnancies will occur. Condoms are also still important, even if you are on the birth control pill, because the pill does not work to prevent the contraction of STIs.

In order to get started on the pill, you need to make an appointment with your doctor or your local Maine Family Planning clinic and get a prescription for a monthly supply of an oral contraceptive. There are many different kinds of the pill that have different doses of the hormones estrogen and progestin, which work together to prevent ovulation and thicken cervical mucus. You can work with your doctor to select the pill with a combination of hormones that is right for you.

Once you have a prescription for birth control pills, you can even sign up to have them delivered to you each month through the mail so you don’t have to worry about getting to a pharmacy to pick up your prescription on time each month!  Maine Family Planning’s Meds by Mail:  CLICK HERE

If you have questions about cost and insurance, as well as possible side effects, don’t be afraid to contact Maine Family Planning. They can answer any questions you may have about getting a prescription for the birth control pill!

Chynna is attending the University of Maine pursuing graduate work in the field of human development with a focus in human sexuality. She is originally from Maine and enjoys spending her free time taking her dog for walks on campus.

What type of contraception is best for me? 

Being a teen is hard, especially when you’re facing pressure from your friends to be sexually active and pressure from your parents to remain abstinent. 

The most important thing to remember when facing the issue of whether or not to be sexually active is that YOU and what YOU want is the most important. 

If your friends are pressuring you to be sexually active, that doesn’t mean you should be. If your parents are stressing that abstinence until marriage is the only acceptable thing, that doesn’t mean you have to remain abstinent. In this situation, it is most important to do what you feel is right for YOU at any given time. 

If you do plan to be sexually active, using proper precautions is crucial— especially if you do not intend to contract an STI or get pregnant!

As a teen, deciding what type of birth control is best for you can be difficult. The easiest, most inexpensive form of birth control for a teen to obtain is the condom. You can get condoms for free at most health clinics (including one of Maine Family Plannings eighteen sites HERE), and maybe even in your schools nurse’s office! You can also purchase condoms at any drugstore (like Walmart, Target, RiteAid, etc.) On average, you can get a box of 12 Durex condoms for around 6 bucks. You can also order condoms online at places like Amazon.com! This is an easy way for you to obtain condoms without needing to physically get to a drugstore. 

Condoms are a great birth control options for teens because they don’t require a prescription! This means you can get as many condoms as you need without having to make a visit to the doctor! Condoms aren’t necessarily the most effective form of birth control, but if they are used correctly every time, they can be up to 98% effective at preventing unwanted pregnancy or STI’s. 

Be sure to do your research on different types of birth control methods before engaging in sexual activity. Condoms are a great first step, especially for teens, because they are so easy to access and don’t require a doctor’s visit or the use of insurance. Check out these links for more information on condoms: http://www.mainefamilyplanning.org/page/2-766/birth-control

https://www.bedsider.org/methods/condom#details_tab

Chynna is attending the University of Maine pursuing graduate work in the field of human development with a focus in human sexuality. She is originally from Maine and enjoys spending her free time taking her dog for walks on campus.

On Our Radar: (Another) Parental Consent Bill in Maine

During the upcoming 2015 legislative session, the Maine Legislature will consider LD 83, a bill that would require minors (under 18) and adults under guardianship to get the written consent of a parent or legal guardian in order to obtain an abortion. If this feels like a  rerun, that’s because it is–legislators defeated a version of the bill in 2013 and 2011, in part because it’s so out of touch with the way real Maine families work.

Maine already has an adult involvement law, and it works. For over 25 years, Maine’s adult involvement law has encouraged family involvement in a teen’s decision to seek abortion, while providing young people with the guidance and support necessary to evaluate all of the options available. The current law is a bipartisan success story–the result of a compromise between republicans and democrats, backed by organizations that support abortion rights and those that oppose them. Our state’s adult involvement law stands as a national model because it works– it truly protects and respects the health, safety, and dignity of young people.  Continue reading

Healthy Kids. Happy Parents. Thanks Birth Control!

99% of adults have used birth control.

It’s that common because it’s that wonderful and it makes so much else in our lives possible.

Which gets us thinking: during this season of giving thanks, and with so many of us having used contraception at some point in our lives, what if we all took a moment to share why WE are thankful for contraception?  (Turkey and awkward holiday conversation with your uncle Jim not required.)

The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy and Bedsider (link) are challenging people all over the country to have an open, honest conversation about birth control and to speak positively about what birth control makes possible for our society. After all, says National Campaign CEO Sarah Brown, “if we can’t talk about contraception, how can we expect people to be comfortable using it?”

So, in the spirit of saying thanks for all that birth control has done for us, please join us TODAY, November 12TH, in sharing why we are thankful for contraception!
You can share a picture, note, or even a video on our Facebook page and use the hashtag #thxbirthcontrol in your message.

Need some help getting started?  Check out this great video, share one of Bedsider’s #thxbirthcontrol postcards, or search the #thxbirthcontrol hashtag on Facebook to see what others have to say!

Here’s what some of our friends had to say: Continue reading

Don’t Be Scared ~ Emergency Contraception is Here

It’s Halloween! Zombies and vampires can be spooky but few things are as anxiety inducing as a pregnancy scare. But have no fear. Emergency contraception (EC) is now available over the counter to anyone, of any age, without an ID.

Here’s what you need to know about getting EC to help prevent an unplanned pregnancy. Continue reading

Abortion in Maine — Protecting Access to a Safe, Legal Procedure

This week, we feature testimony given at a Judiciary Committee hearing regarding LD 1339 and LD 760 – bills that would restrict access to abortion in Maine.

These bills will come up for a vote this week, please call your legislators and ask them to reject any further restrictions to abortion services.

My name is Ruth Lockhart and I am Executive Director and Co-Founder of Mabel Wadsworth Women’s Health Center in Bangor. We are one of only three public centers where a woman seeking an abortion in Maine can go.

I’m going to share with you how abortion care works at Mabel Wadsworth Center to dispel any myths or misconceptions about how are abortions are provided for women in Aroostook, Hancock, Penobscot, Piscataquis, Waldo and Washington counties. Continue reading

Beyond “The Talk” ~ Preventing Teen Pregnancy

In last week’s blog post highlighting Teen Pregnancy Prevention Month, we described what the FPA is doing to support Maine educators and students. As the month of May comes to a close, we want to give you – trusted adults, teachers, parents and concerned community members – ideas about how you can help prevent teen pregnancy.

Maybe you’re wondering, “Me?! What can I do?”

Well, there are two words that can start you on your way – listen and talk. Continue reading

The Local Scene ~ Teen Pregnancy Prevention in Maine Schools

Kathy Kerr, Teacher at Mount Blue Middle School, Farmington

So far during Teen Pregnancy Prevention month, we have taken a global, national and statewide look at teen pregnancy.  Now we’re narrowing our focus even more — to the classroom level — to see what some Maine teachers and schools are doing.

FPA’s Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program works with schools and community organizations dedicated to providing youth with comprehensive sexuality education.  Our program’s main goal is to strengthen the capacity of Maine educators and schools as they provide sexuality education programs that deliver positive results.

We promote the use of evidence-based programs because they’ve been proven to change sexual behaviors among youth, like: Continue reading